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So @Yannis asked this question: Which cities had chthonic Zeus cults?

I am quite conflicted about whether such questions are on topic. It's a question about "whom did the people from this time period worship"? Not "what are the details of this particular mythological story?

I think it's borderline; so I create the question to ask the community whether we want questions like this one. What do you all think?

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    I think they should be considered on-topic. Whom people worshipped is closely tied to the mythology surrounding the figure. – codingEnthusiast May 4 '15 at 15:26
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I'll say yes. Questions like this have a distinct bearing on the mythological figure(s) in question, because the culture of the people can influence the mythology involved. There have been questions about traditions related to mythology and how civlizations influenced the mythology of other civilizations. The question at hand also says

Did these cults consider Zeus a sky god with chthonic properties, or a completely chthonic deity?

which means that one part of the question is clearly about an aspect of a deity, and is on-topic. The other half is in question.

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  • Good answer, but as to the second half of your answer, note that a question which is half on topic and half off topic should be edited to only include the on topic half; the first half needs to be able to stand on it's own to remain unedited. – durron597 May 4 '15 at 17:42
  • @durron597 Of course. – HDE 226868 May 4 '15 at 17:43
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The linked question is far more than "What cities worshiped Zeus?" it shows a knowledge of the subject and who the version of the mythology is linked to the cities. So while general net casting questions should be discouraged and closed, well written questions should be encouraged and accepted.

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I agree with other posters that as phrased, it's ontopic (See Chad's answer for very clear explanation).

However, a more general question (e.g. "Which cities worshipped Athena as patron goddess"), would be far more likely to be well-answered on History.SE than here and therefore should probably be off-topic (and migrated to History.SE).

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